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'booker-díj' címkével ellátott könyvek a rukkolán

 


Barry Unsworth - Sacred ​Hunger
he ​story is set in the mid 18th century and centers around the Liverpool Merchant, a slave ship employed in the triangular trade, a central trade route in the Atlantic slave trade. The two main characters are cousins Erasmus Kemp, son of a wealthy merchant from Lancashire, and Matthew Paris, a physician and scientist who goes on the voyage. The novel's central theme is greed, with the subject of slavery being a primary medium for exploring the issue. The story line has a very extensive cast of characters, some featuring in only one scene, others continually developed throughout the story, but most described in intricate detail. The narrative interweaves elements of appalling cruelty and horror with extended comedic interludes, and employs frequent period expressions.

Peter Carey - Oscar ​and Lucinda
The ​Booker Prize-winning novel--now a major motion picture from Fox Searchlight Pictures. This sweeping, irrepressibly inventive novel, is a romance, but a romance of the sort that could only take place in nineteenth-century Australia. For only on that sprawling continent--a haven for misfits of both the animal and human kingdoms--could a nervous Anglican minister who gambles on the instructions of the Divine become allied with a teenaged heiress who buys a glassworks to help liberate her sex. And only the prodigious imagination of Peter Carey could implicate Oscar and Lucinda in a narrative of love and commerce, religion and colonialism, that culminates in a half-mad expedition to transport a glass church across the Outback.

Alan Hollinghurst - The ​Line of Beauty
It ​is the summer of 1983, and young Nick Guest, an innocent in matters of politics and money, has moved into an attic room in the Notting Hill home of the Feddens: Gerald, an ambitious new Tory MP, his wealthy wife Rachel, and their children Toby and Catherine. As the boom years of the mid-80s unfold, Nick becomes caught up in the Fedden's world, while also pursuing his own private obsession, with beauty - a prize as compelling to him as power and riches are to his friends. An early affair with a young black council worker gives him first experience of romance; but it is a later affair, with a beautiful millionaire, that brings into question the larger fantasies of a ruthless decade. Winner of the 2004 Man Booker Prize.

Graham Swift - Last ​Orders
This ​novel follows four men once close to Jack Dodds, a London butcher, who meet to carry out his last wish: to have his ashes scattered into the sea.

Howard Jacobson - The ​Finkler Question
‘He ​should have seen it coming. His life had been one mishap after another. So he should have been prepared for this one…’ Julian Treslove, a professionally unspectacular former BBC radio producer, and Sam Finkler, a popular Jewish philosopher, writer and television personality, are old school friends. Despite a prickly relationship and very different lives, they’ve never quite lost touch with each other - or with their former teacher, Libor Sevcik, a Czech always more concerned with the wider world than with exam results. Now, both Libor and Sam are recently widowed, and with Treslove, his chequered and unsuccessful record with women rendering him an honorary third widower, they dine at Libor’s grand, central London apartment. It’s a sweetly painful evening of reminiscence in which all three remove themselves to a time before they had loved and lost; a time before they had fathered children, before the devastation of separations, before they had prized anything greatly enough to fear the loss of it. Better, perhaps, to go through life without knowing happiness at all because that way you have less to mourn? Treslove finds he has tears enough for the unbearable sadness of both his friends’ losses. And it’s that very evening, at exactly 11:30, as Treslove, walking home, hesitates a moment outside the window of the oldest violin dealer in the country, that he is attacked. And after this, his whole sense of who and what he is will slowly and ineluctably change. The Finkler Question is a scorching story of friendship and loss, exclusion and belonging, and of the wisdom and humanity of maturity. Funny, furious, unflinching, this extraordinary novel shows one of our finest writers at his brilliant best.

Yann Martel - Het ​Leven van Pi
Het ​leven van Pi vertelt het ongelooflijke verhaal van Piscine Patel (Pi), een zestienjarige Indiase jongen, wiens vader een dierentuin in India heeft. Wanneer de familie besluit het land te verlaten wordt de hele dierentuin ingescheept. Maar het schip vergaal en de enige overlevenden op de reddingssloep zijn Pi, een hyena, een zebra met een gebroken been en een tijger van 200 kilo.Yann Martel (1963) werd geboren in Spanje en woont in Montreal, Canada. Met zijn roman Het leven van Pi won hij in 2002 de Man Booker Prize. Het is het meest besproken boek van de afgelopen jaren. 'Het leven van Pi laat ons geloven in de verbeeldingskracht van de literatuur, in de noodzaak van het betere verhaal.'

Julian Barnes - Il ​senso di una fine
Tony ​Webster è un uomo senza qualità. Negli studi e nel lavoro, nei sentimenti e, c'è da scommetterci, anche nel sesso. Ma la lettera con cui un avvocato gli annuncia il lascito di cinquecento sterline e di un diario proveniente dal passato scuote il fondo limaccioso della sua esistenza. Tony deve ora scoprire chi gli ha destinato quell'ingombrante eredità e perché ha scelto proprio lui, e quale segreto rabbiosamente custodito quel diario potrebbe rivelare. Nel porsi queste domande, s'imbatterà in risposte che avrebbe preferito non conoscere e dovrà imparare a sue spese che «la nostra vita non è la nostra vita, ma solo la storia che ne abbiamo raccontato».

Yann Martel - Schiffbruch ​mit Tiger
Schiffbruch ​mit Tiger? Diese Geschichte würden Sie nicht glauben? Kein Wunder. Fantastisch. Verwegen. Atemberaubend. Wahnsinnig komisch. Eine Geschichte, die Sie an Gott glauben lässt. Pi Patel, der Sohn eines indischen Zoobesitzers und praktizierender Hindu, Christ und Muslim erleidet mit einer Hyäne, einem Orang-Utan, einem verletzten Zebra und einem 450 Pfund schweren bengalischen Tiger namens Richard Parker Schiffbruch. Bald hat der Tiger alle erledigt - alle, außer Pi. Alleine treiben sie in einem Rettungsboot auf dem Ozean. Eine wundersame, abenteuerliche Odyssee beginnt. ››Martel schreibt wie ein leidenschaftlicher Paul Auster.‹‹ Times Literary Supplement ››Eine Reminiszenz an Italo Calvino.‹‹ Independent on Sunday

V. S. Naipaul - In ​a Free State
No ​writer has rendered our boundariless, post-colonial world more acutely or prophetically than V. S. Naipaul, or given its upheavals such a hauntingly human face. A perfect case in point is this riveting novel, a masterful and stylishly rendered narrative of emigration, dislocation, and dread, accompanied by four supporting narratives. In the beginning it is just a car trip through Africa. Two English people--Bobby, a civil servant with a guilty appetite for African boys, and Linda, a supercilious compound wife-- are driving back to their enclave after a stay in the capital. But in between lies the landscape of an unnamed country whose squalor and ethnic bloodletting suggest Idi Amin's Uganda. And the farther Naipaul's protagonists travel into it, the more they find themselves crossing the line that separates privileged outsiders from horrified victims. Alongside this Conradian tour de force are four incisive portraits of men seeking liberation far from home. By turns funny and terrifying, sorrowful and unsparing, In A Free State is Naipaul at his best.

Bernardine Evaristo - Girl, ​Woman, Other
Teeming ​with life and crackling with energy - a love song to modern Britain and black womanhood Girl, Woman, Other follows the lives and struggles of twelve very different characters. Mostly women, black and British, they tell the stories of their families, friends and lovers, across the country and through the years. Joyfully polyphonic and vibrantly contemporary, this is a gloriously new kind of history, a novel of our times: celebratory, ever-dynamic and utterly irresistible.

Hilary Mantel - Bring ​Up the Bodies
The ​sequel to the Man Booker-winning Wolf Hall. 'My boy Thomas, give him a dirty look and he'll gouge your eye out. Trip him, and he'll cut off your leg,' says Walter Cromwell in the year 1500. 'But if you don't cut across him he's a very gentleman. And he'll stand anyone a drink.' By 1535 Thomas Cromwell, the blacksmith's son, is far from his humble origins. Chief Minister to Henry VIII, his fortunes have risen with those of Anne Boleyn, Henry's second wife, for whose sake Henry has broken with Rome and created his own church. But Henry's actions have forced England into dangerous isolation, and Anne has failed to do what she promised: bear a son to secure the Tudor line. When Henry visits Wolf Hall, Cromwell watches as Henry falls in love with the silent, plain Jane Seymour. The minister sees what is at stake: not just the king's pleasure, but the safety of the nation. As he eases a way through the sexual politics of the court, its miasma of gossip, he must negotiate a 'truth' that will satisfy Henry and secure his own career. But neither minister nor king will emerge undamaged from the bloody theatre of Anne's final days. In 'Bring up the Bodies', sequel to the Man Booker Prize-winning 'Wolf Hall', Hilary Mantel explores one of the most mystifying and frightening episodes in English history: the destruction of Anne Boleyn. This new novel is a speaking picture, an audacious vision of Tudor England that sheds its light on the modern world. It is the work of one of our great writers at the height of her powers.

Colm Tóibín - The ​Testament of Mary
Colm ​Tóibín's The Testament of Mary is a short, powerful novel about one of the most famous mothers in history. From the author of Brooklyn, in a voice that is both tender and filled with rage, The Testament of Mary tells the story of a cataclysmic event which led to an overpowering grief. For Mary, her son has been lost to the world, and now, living in exile and in fear, she tries to piece together the memories of the events that led to her son's brutal death. To her he was a vulnerable figure, surrounded by men who could not be trusted, living in a time of turmoil and change. As her life and her suffering begin to acquire the resonance of myth, Mary struggles to break the silence surrounding what she knows to have happened. In her effort to tell the truth in all its gnarled complexity, she slowly emerges as a figure of immense moral stature as well as a woman from history rendered now as fully human.

George Saunders - Lincoln ​in the Bardo
The ​long-awaited first novel from the author of Tenth of December: a moving and original father-son story featuring none other than Abraham Lincoln, as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters, living and dead, historical and invented February 1862. The Civil War is less than one year old. The fighting has begun in earnest, and the nation has begun to realize it is in for a long, bloody struggle. Meanwhile, President Lincoln’s beloved eleven-year-old son, Willie, lies upstairs in the White House, gravely ill. In a matter of days, despite predictions of a recovery, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. “My poor boy, he was too good for this earth,” the president says at the time. “God has called him home.” Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns, alone, to the crypt several times to hold his boy’s body. From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory where ghosts mingle, gripe, commiserate, quarrel, and enact bizarre acts of penance. Within this transitional state—called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo—a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie’s soul. Lincoln in the Bardo is an astonishing feat of imagination and a bold step forward from one of the most important and influential writers of his generation. Formally daring, generous in spirit, deeply concerned with matters of the heart, it is a testament to fiction’s ability to speak honestly and powerfully to the things that really matter to us. Saunders has invented a thrilling new form that deploys a kaleidoscopic, theatrical panorama of voices to ask a timeless, profound question: How do we live and love when we know that everything we love must end?

Alison Pick - Far ​To Go
Longlisted ​for the 2011 MAN BOOKER PRIZE for Fiction, FAR TO GO is a powerful and profoundly moving story about one family's epic journey to flee the Nazi occupation of their homeland in 1939. Pavel and Anneliese Bauer are affluent, secular Jews, whose lives are turned upside down by the arrival of the German forces in Czechoslovakia. Desperate to avoid deportation, the Bauers flee to Prague with their six-year-old son, Pepik, and his beloved nanny, Marta. When the family try to flee without her to Paris, Marta betrays them to her Nazi boyfriend. But it is through Marta's determination that Pepik secures a place on a Kindertransport, though he never sees his parents or Marta again. Inspired by Alison Pick's own grandparents who fled their native Czechoslovakia for Canada during the Second World War, FAR TO GO is a deeply personal and emotionally harrowing novel.

Thomas Keneally - Schindler's ​Ark
In ​the shadow of Auschwitz, a flamboyant German industrialist grew into a living legend to the Jews of Cracow. He was a womaniser, a heavy drinker, and a bon viveur, but to them he became a saviour. This is the extraordinary story of Oskar Schindler, who risked his life to protect Jews in Nazi-occupied Poland and who was transformed by the war into a man with a mission, a compassionate angel of mercy.

Tom McCarthy - C
C ​follows the short, intense life of Serge Carrefax, a man who - as his name suggests - surges into the electric modernity of the early twentieth century, transfixed by the technologies that will obliterate him. Born to the sound of one of the very earliest experimental wireless stations, Serge finds himself steeped in a weird world of transmissions, whose very air seems filled with cryptic and poetic signals of all kinds. When personal loss strikes him in his adolescence, this world takes on a darker and more morbid aspect. What follows is a stunning tour de force in which the eerily idyllic settings of pre-war Europe give way to the exhilarating flightpaths of the frontline aeroplane radio operator, then the prison camps of Germany, the drug-fuelled London of the roaring twenties and, finally, the ancient tombs of Egypt. Reminiscent of Bolaño, Beckett and Pynchon, this is a remarkable novel - a compelling, sophisticated and sublimely imaginative book uncovering the hidden codes and dark rhythms that sustain life.

Nadine Gordimer - The ​Conservationist
Mehring, ​a wealthy, dominating South African industrialist moves to preserve his way of life, his power, and his possessions in the face of massive injustice and suffering, changing times, and death.

George Saunders - Lincoln ​és a bardo
Régóta ​várt regényével George Saunders, az amerikai irodalom nagymestere eddigi legeredetibb, legtranszcendensebb és legmegrendítőbb munkáját adja az Olvasó kezébe. A cselekmény egyetlen éjszaka alatt bontakozik ki egy temetőben, melyet egy káprázatos kórus hangjai beszélnek el: a Lincoln és a bardó olyan párját ritkító irodalmi kísérlet, amely csakis Saunders elméjében foganhatott meg. 1862 februárja. Épp csak kitört az amerikai polgárháború. A harcok most kezdenek igazán elmérgesedni, és az ország lakói lassan megértik: hosszú és véres küzdelem vár rájuk. Lincoln elnök tizenegy éves kisfia, Willie közben súlyos betegen fekszik a Fehér Ház egyik emeleti szobájában. Noha az orvosok azt jósolták, hogy felépül, Willie néhány nap leforgása alatt meghal és egy georgetowni temetőben helyezik nyugalomra. "Az én szegény kisfiam túl jó volt ennek a világnak - mondja az elnök ekkor. - Isten hazahívta." Az újságok arról számolnak be, hogy a gyászoló Lincoln többször is visszatért egyedül a kriptához, hogy átölelje fia holttestét. George Saunders eme történelmi tény köré szövi feledhetetlen történetét a családi szeretetről és veszteségről, amely kitör a valós, történeti keretek közül és egy vidám, ugyanakkor rémisztő természetfeletti dimenzióban folytatódik tovább. Willie Lincoln igencsak fura purgatóriumban találja magát, ahol a szellemek összejárnak, panaszkodnak, átérzik egymás szenvedését, veszekednek és a legkülönfélébb bizarr módokon vezekelnek bűneikért. Ebben a köztes állapotban - amelyet a tibeti hagyomány bardónak nevez - rettenetes küzdelem veszi kezdetét a kis Willie lelkéért. A Lincoln és a bardó az emberi képzelet döbbenetes terméke, és igen bátor továbblépés a modern amerikai irodalom egyik legfontosabb és legbefolyásosabb alakjától. A merész forma, a nagyvonalú szellemiség, és a szív mélységeinek feltárása valóságos hitvallássá emelik ezt a művet, amelyben az író hitet tesz amellett, hogy a fikció képes őszintén és döbbenetes erővel megragadni olyan témákat, amelyek igazán fontosak számunkra. Saunders izgalmas új formát dolgoz ki, és ennek segítségével az élő és meghalt, a történelmi és kitalált személyek hangjának olyan kaleidoszkópikus, teátrális panorámáját közvetíti, melyben egyetlen időtlen, mély kérdés visszhangzik mindvégig: Hogyan éljünk és hogyan szeressünk, ha tudjuk, hogy minden, amit szeretünk, elmúlik egyszer?

J. M. Coetzee - Life ​& Times of Michael K
In ​a South Africa torn by civil war, Michael K sets out to take his mother back to her rural home. On the way there she dies, leaving him alone in an anarchic world of brutal roving armies. Imprisoned, Michael is unable to bear confinement and escapes, determined to live with dignity. Life and Times of Michael K goes to the centre of human experience -- the need for an interior, spiritual life, for some connections to the world in which we live, and for purity of vision.

Ruth Prawer Jhabvala - Heat ​and Dust
The ​events of the story take place in India, during the periods of the British Raj in the 1920s and the present day of the novel (the 1970s). A young English woman searches for the truth about her greataunt Olivia (1920s). The narrator discovers that Olivia was a woman smothered by the social restrictions placed upon her by British society. She falls in love with a Nawab and becomes pregnant with his child. Her decision to abort the baby results in a scandal. In discovering the truth about these events, the narrator also comes to fall in love with an Indian man, understand herself better and develops an interest in India.

Marlon James - A ​Brief History of Seven Killings
On ​3 December 1976, just weeks before the general election and two days before Bob Marley was to play the Smile Jamaica Concert to ease political tensions, seven gunmen from West Kingston stormed his house with machine guns blazing. Marley survived and went on to perform at the free concert, but the next day he left the country, and didn’t return for two years. Not a lot was recorded about the fate of the seven gunmen, but much has been said, whispered and sung about in the streets of West Kingston, with information surfacing at odd times, only to sink into rumour and misinformation. Inspired by this near-mythic event, A Brief History of Seven Killings takes the form of an imagined oral biography, told by ghosts, witnesses, killers, members of parliament, drug dealers, conmen, beauty queens, FBI and CIA agents, reporters, journalists, and even Keith Richards' drug dealer. Marlon James’s bold undertaking traverses strange landscapes and shady characters, as motivations are examined – and questions asked – in this compelling novel of monumental scope and ambition.

Kingsley Amis - Ending ​Up
Ending ​Up is a grotesque and memorable dance of death, full of bickering, bitching, backstabbing, drinking (of course), and idiocy of all sorts. It is a book about dying people and about a dying England, clinging to its memories of greatness as it succumbs to terminal decay. Everyone wants a comfortable place to die, and Kingsley Amis’s characters have found it in Happeny Tuppeny Cottage, out in the country, where assorted septuagenarians have come together to see one another out the door of life. There’s grotesque Adela, whose sole passion is her cheapness; her cursing and scoffing brother Brigadier Bernard Bastable, always strategizing a new retreat to the bathroom before sallying forth to play some especially nasty practical joke; Shorty, the servant, who years ago had a fling with the brigadier in the barracks and now organizes his daily rounds from woodpile to wardrobe around a trail of hidden bottles; George Zeyer, the distinguished professor of history, bedridden and helpless to articulate his still- coherent thoughts; and Marigold, who slowly but surely is forgetting it all. And now it is Christmas. Children and grandchildren are coming to visit their ailing elders. They don’t know what lies in store before the story ends. None of us do.

Bernice Rubens - The ​Elected Member
In ​this 1970 Booker Prize-winning novel, Norman is the clever one of a closely-knit Jewish family in London's East End. Infant prodigy, brilliant barrister, the apple of his parents' eyes—until at 41 he becomes a drug addict, confined to his bedroom, at the mercy of his hallucinations and paranoia.

NoViolet Bulawayo - We ​Need New Names
'To ​play the country-game, we have to choose a country. Everybody wants to be the USA and Britain and Canada and Australia and Switzerland and them. Nobody wants to be rags of countries like Congo, like Somalia, like Iraq, like Sudan, like Haiti and not even this one we live in - who wants to be a terrible place of hunger and things falling apart?' Darling and her friends live in a shanty called Paradise, which of course is no such thing. It isn't all bad, though. There's mischief and adventure, games of Find bin Laden, stealing guavas, singing Lady Gaga at the tops of their voices. They dream of the paradises of America, Dubai, Europe, where Madonna and Barack Obama and David Beckham live. For Darling, that dream will come true. But, like the thousands of people all over the world trying to forge new lives far from home, Darling finds this new paradise brings its own set of challenges - for her and also for those she's left behind.

Stanley Middleton - Holiday
Edwin ​Fisher is on holiday at the English seaside - but this revisiting of childhood haunts is no ordinary holiday. Edwin is seeking to understand the failure of his marriage to Meg, but it turns out that her parents are staying at the same resort - whether by accident or design - and are keen to patch up the relationship. As the past and his enigmatic wife loom larger, deeper truths emerge and the perspective shifts in unexpected ways. This is an extremely subtle story, a consummate portrait of English provincial life told with all Stanley Middleton's artistry and depth of feeling. It was joint winner of the Booker Prize in 1974.

Paul Scott - Staying ​on
In ​this sequel to The Raj Quartet, Colonel Tusker and Lucy Smalley stay on in the hills of Pankot after Indian independence deprives them of their colonial status. Finally fed up with accommodating her husband, Lucy claims a degree of independence herself. Eloquent and hilarious, she and Tusker act out class tensions among the British of the Raj and give voice to the loneliness, rage, and stubborn affection in their marriage. Staying On won the Booker Prize in 1977 and was made into a motion picture starring Trevor Howard and Celia Johnson in 1979. "Staying On far transcends the events of its central action. . . . [The work] should help win for Scott . . . the reputation he deserves--as one of the best novelists to emerge from Britain's silver age."--Robert Towers, Newsweek "Scott's vision is both precise and painterly. Like an engraver cross-hatching in the illusion of fullness, he selects nuances that will make his characters take on depth and poignancy."--Jean G. Zorn, New York Times Book Review "A graceful comic coda to the earlier song of India. . . . No one writing knows or can evoke an Anglo-Indian setting better than Scott."--Paul Gray, Time "Staying On provides a sort of postscript to [Scott's] deservedly acclaimed The Raj Quartet. . . . He has, as it were, summoned up the Raj's ghost in Staying On. . . . It is the story of the living death, in retirement, and the final end of a walk-on character from the quartet. . . . Scott has completed the task of covering in the form of a fictional narrative the events leading up to India's partition and the achievement of independence in 1947. It is, on any showing, a creditable achievement."--Malcolm Muggeridge, New York Times Book

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